Cold Hands? Here is some help!

Warm skin, for cold hands

When your out fishing on a cold day, making changes to your rig, baiting your hook, casting, or doing any number of other things can be a challenge if your fingers are cold to the bone. If, like me, you have medical condition that makes your hands cold even in the summer, it can be a nightmare.

I have a condition called Raynaud’s phenomenon which causes decreased blood flow to my fingers. My doctor’s tried a number of different medications to help with this problem but none worked as well as the one that I found on my own. While looking for something that would help me keep my fingers, I went to the Raynaud’s Association website and looked at a variety of products. The one I chose to try is one widely used in the NFL. If you ever wondered how some of those men played in freezing temperatures with there arms uncovered, Warm Skin might just be how they do it. There was a report by ESPN on how NFL trainers keep the players warm on cold days and one of the ways is by supplying them with Warm Skin.

I was so impressed, I bought a jar of it and I can tell you that it works. Since I started using it, I have not had any of he sores and discoloration that can be symptoms of this problem.

Warm Skin is not a heat balm like Icy Hot or Salon Spas, it does not warm your skin that way. What is does is create an invisible layer that seals in your natural body temperature. Now before I go out, I apply Warm Skin to my fingers and hands. If it is real cold, I may add light gloves as well, but normally I don’t need them. Warm Skin can be used on any part of your body so I you want to keep your neck warmer, rub some of on there too!

You can buy Warm Skin on Amazon or any of a number of other online retailers.

Cayucos Pier

While on an overnight trip to Morro Bay, CA to go on a bike tour, it rained the first day so I decided to drive 7 miles up the coast to Cayucos and check out the Cayucos Pier.

It is a small pier but better maintained than any of the other piers I have been on in California. There were only three people fishing off the end of pier and they did not speak much English but fishermen can communicate with each other regardless of a language barrier.

They informed me that they usually caught Mackerel and Smelt and did not really try for any other species, though Shovel nose Sharks and Bat Rays are common.

This pier is about a 2 1/2 hour drive from my house so I plan to fish up there in the next week or two.

The Pond and the Pacific

The Pond

I was invited to spend the night at a magnificent 200-acre property called Ranch Grande located about 20 miles north of Ojai, CA, so this week my wife and I took the owner up on his offer.  You can do a lot of things there like horseback riding, canoe, rowboat, or paddle boat around a pond, play with the 13 or 14 friendly dogs, go on the daily “goat walk” with 122 goats (can you say stampede?).  You can play games like pool, Scrabble, Monopoly, in the Rock Room and if you play there is a grand piano at your disposal.  You can also visit all the other animals which include pot bellied pigs, chickens, sheep, and llamas.  I did most of these things and I also went pond fishing.

When I was 5 years old while my grandpa was teaching me how to fish, we often went to a small pond where I learned his tricks and listened to his advice.  Standing on the little fishing dock at Rancho Grande brought back all the nostalgic memories I have of those times.

Though I didn’t catch any fish, I wouldn’t trade the few hours I spent trying to do so while thinking of grandpa for any amount of money.  Below are some pictures of the property. 

If you want to visit the property, you can find all the details here: http://www.ranchogrande.com

The Pacific

The California coast is slowly coming back to life even though the COVID-19 pandemic is still raging around the country.  Personally, I think it is a terrible idea to begin opening things up again and that the second wave of the disease will make the first one look like a ripple in a pond.  However, I never saw a reason to shut down fishing piers.  Fishing is usually a singular sport and if you do go fishing with a group, it is usually with family or trusted friends.  Fishing on a 1600-foot-long, 20-foot-wide pier like the Ventura Pier gives you a lot of space to practice social distancing as well.  The Sun is nature’s greatest disinfectant, too. 

Well, last Friday, the pier reopened and I have been out to it three times since then.  The Pacific Ocean is warming up, with a water temperature of 62 degrees today, and the fishing is getting better due to it.  I also think the closing of the pier for a few months allowed the fish population to rebuild because the first fish I caught was a Rock Fish, I have not seen any of them out there in years, and today I caught my first Mackerel of the season. 

I may just go lobby the city council and ask them to shut the pier down for a few months each year as a matter of course. 

Signs of Life

Not practicing Social Distancing…+

For a few months access to the Pacific Ocean has been non-existent in my part of SoCal due to necessary closures in wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. But last week I found out that the Goleta Pier, which is part of the Santa Barbara County Parks division had opened to all activity including fishing. So yesterday I made the 43 mile commute from my home to check it out. With gas being cheap (by SoCal standards) and traffic being light (again by SoCal standards) it was a nice trip.

Only two small Croakers today, but…

With the air temperature around 80 degrees, no wind, and the ocean temperature nearing 60 degrees, it seemed like perfect fishing weather. I left after 4 very nice hours of enjoying the sun and the clean ocean air with only two small Croakers to my credit but that does not mean it was a bad day. I caught one of them on my deep bottom line and one on my ultra-ultra light over the side line which showed me that the fish were all over but scattered. Also, there were a number of fishing birds out catching fish even the above Pelican that came to visit me. I tried to tell him about Social Distancing but he didn’t care–all he wanted was a fish. Since I didn’t have one to give to him, he eventually gave up and flew away to catch his own.

A nearly deserted pier–not really…

From the picture above, it may look like the pier is deserted but that is not the case. It is just so long that Social Distancing is not something you need to think about. When I left, I counted over two dozen anglers on the pier.

At one time, the Goleta Pier was one of the best fishing spots in SoCal but if you read my recent articles about it, that is no longer the case however since it is open and it is the only place to go for now, I will be making this trek every Wednesday until further notice. I can only hope that eventually it will get back to its glory days.

The Pacific and the Pandemic

One who did no practice social distancing…

I haven’t been out to the Ventura Pier since all hell broke loose because of the current worldwide pandemic even though I know fishing out there is not prohibited under California’s Marshall Law. The fishing has been way off due to the cold Pacific water anyway, but I had been checking in now and again. Today I decided to go once more since at least the weather is warming up.

Sadly, the fish must be practicing social distancing since nothing came within 6-feet of my bait and for the first time in my memory, I was totally shut out.

Nothing living being came within 6-feet me either except for this Egret with its foot-long very sharp looking beak. I tossed him a fat salted anchovy as a bribe to leave me alone. He seemed to enjoy it then flew away.

Most of the state parks in California are shut down which includes most of the coastline so surf fishing is out for me. Also, all the party boats are in dry dock for those who like to go on them. So, right now, pier fishing is my only option and since it is prohibited to travel from one county to the other except under certain circumstances, Stearns Wharf and the Goleta Pier in Santa Barbara County are off limits to me. That only leaves my home pier and as it warms up, I plan to go out at least once a week.

Even though fishing is usually thought of a singular endeavor, people do go out and fish together but these are usually friends you can trust and not strangers so we all need to get out either with buddies or on you own since one day this will all pass and keeping some semblance of normalcy now will make it easier to put things back together later.

I can’t think of a better way to spend a day in light of all that is going on than fishing in the bright sunshine because sunlight is nature’s best antiseptic.

So, fish when you can and when you know it is safe to do so. If it is not safe, then stay home, the fish, the water, and the Earth will still be there when it is safe to go out again.

“Catching” Up…

It has been a while since my last blog post but that doesn’t mean that I have not been out to my home pier in Ventura to check on fishing conditions, it just means that there is still little to report due to the continued cold water in the Pacific Ocean.

The weather in Ventura was dry and warm last week so I went out a few times since this week’s forecast calls for a lot of rain, which we need, accompanied by colder temperatures. Most likely, I won’t be out at all this week.

I can’t say that the fishing has really picked up even though I did haul in a dozen Smelt on Thursday, but the variety of fish I have been catching is more diverse than it has been.

That is an indication that change is on the way.

On Tuesday, I caught seven fish. One was the fat 10″ Wall Eyed Perch pictured above, one was a large Smelt, and five were White Croakers. Two of these White Croakers were caught on my bottom trolling line and three were caught as I fished over the side with my ultra-light rig. Catching Croakers at all depth levels shows me that the fish are coming back. The variety shows me that as well.

I will “catch” you later with another update in a week or so. For now, we are enjoying the rain.